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Gerda van Leeuwen’s work recently has involved in an interest and awareness for the animal world around us. Animal creatures are frequently appearing  in her prints, paintings and ceramics. In my prints I wanted to express the ferociousness and determination in the animals around us.

Her mono prints are partly inspired by the Lascaux Cave paintings in France.

Her cave paintings are in a way a very early form of graffiti. They are mostly animals.

People have for thousands of years communicated and told their stories by painting graffiti on walls in public places.

Gerda forms the animal shapes from steel wool. In different grades, from fine to coarse.

The steel wool is rough to work and therefore the end result gives a primitive feeling.

Something I was looking for. After creating the forms I print them on my etching press on paper and also on canvas.

Gerda Van Leeuwen

Gerda van Leeuwen received her Arts Education in Printmaking at Academy Artibus in Utrecht, The Netherlands. She received a work/travel grant from the Arts Group, Kunstliefde to study Prints by artist Piranesi in Italy. A grant from the Dutch Cultural Counsel made it possible to buy an etching press. She set up a fully equipped printing facility and collaborated with other artists in making print portfolios and art books.
Till 1985 she taught drawing and print making at hight schools and a maximum security prison in Utrecht, Holland. Had various solo print and painting exhibitions during that period. Moved to New York in 1985 and set up printing studio with Peter Yamaoka in TriBeCa called Hudson Street Press.
From 1985-2001, she participated in various exhibitions showing prints published by Hudson Street Press. 2006 she moved her printing facilities to Roxbury, NY and works and teaches printmaking. Garda van Leeuwen’s work is on permanent display at the Longer Gallery, Margaretville, NY since 2009. She is the gallery manager. Work can be viewed at http://www.longyeargallery.org. Prints by Gerda van Leeuwen are in private and corporate collections in the USA, the Netherlands, China and Japan.

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